Data STORY

For more than half a century Palestinian refugees are still waiting for a solution

The conflict between Israelis and Palestinians continues to this day. Palestinian claims that one of the key issues that would not help solve the conflict is the denial of Israel to follow the UN resolution.

Since the creation of Israel state in 1948, Palestinian people have been separated and most of them became refugees living in different countries. According to ANRWA, Palestinian refugees are defined as “people whose normal place of residence was Palestine during the period 1 June 1946 to 15 May 1948, and who lost both home and means of livelihood as a result of the 1948 conflict.”

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The conflict forced 85 percent of the Palestinian population to leave their home land in what became Israel. Their right to return was written into a U.N. resolution that year, but 65 years later this issue has yet to be resolved. Now there are about 5 million Palestinian refugees living in refugee camps in Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, Gaza and the West Bank. A Palestinian refugee camp, according to UNRWA, is defined as a plot of land placed at the disposal of UNRWA by the host government to accommodate Palestinian refugees and set up facilities to cater to their needs.

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The Israeli state and the world cannot keep ignoring that Palestinian refugees are human beings that deserve justice and are entitled to return to their homes.

Source: Palestinian Central Bureau of Statisti
Source: BBC NEWS
Source: ANRWA
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Elizabeth Campbell -Video Story

Elizabeth Campbell is a 40-year-old yoga instructor at Hofstra University.

Campbell was introduced to yoga 14-years ago. Through her yoga practice Elizabeth found peace within herself, family, and the world surrounding her. She even changed her career in business and became a yoga instructor.

 Now Elizabeth is a full-time yoga teacher, who enjoys and loves what she is doing for herself and what she can offer to others.  Elizabeth encourages students to try yoga because the practice could help them release some of the stress they gain while trying to achieve satisfactory results in their school work.

In the mean time, Elizabeth will continue to spread the  positive effects she attained from yoga to the world.

Video Story Critique

 

“7-Year Old Boy Saving Our Planet, One Can at a Time”

 

KID RUNS RECYCLING BIZ

When it comes to covering human struggles and accomplishments; AJ+ is one of the top global news community, unifying our modern world. If you are looking for stories that are influencing our world, AJ+ is the right news source for you. From stories that make us laugh, cry and even inspire us as one community, AJ+ unquestionably gets right to the point.

In honor of Earth Day, AJ+ posted a video of a boy recycling in his home town, depicting that he wants to save the earth. Perhaps it is unusual to see a 7-year-old, who runs his own recycling business.  Ryan Hickman saved money for his future college tuition.

 Although Ryan does not speak much in the video; his actions and the subtitles written throughout the video give us a broad understanding of what Ryan is doing and how he is trying to make our planet a safer and better place. The music and subtitles meshed well together in the video; giving an upbeat and inspiring vibe to viewers.

Malgai Mendez is More than a Cashier – Photo Story

 

Most people have specific dreams that want to achieve in life. And some of these dreams seem not at all hard to accomplish if you work hard to achieve them. However, not everyone is fortunate, for some people these dreams don’t happen even though they work hard to reach them. Magali Mendez, who is working as a cashier at Breslin Kiosk at Hofstra University, came to America at the age of sixteen. Malgai continued her education and went to school in NY.  She certainly had a different plan than becoming a cashier. Though, sometimes, not accomplishing your dreams, does not stop you from finding an alternative. Life must go on and you should do the best to continue. And that’s exactly what Malgai has done.

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Every morning at seven o’clock, Malgai Mendez arrives to work  at Breslin Kiosk in the   Breslin bulding at Hofstra University.

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Working as a cashier for more than seven years, Malgai enjoys her job especially that she gets to work by herself. “I like working here alone because no one bothers me,” she said. “I don’t have a boss to tell me what to do.”
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Malgai said that the students are usually nice and kind to her. She also said that  it’s not always busy at work “the food is expansive here.”

 

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Malgai, who is 27 years old, is married and also a mother to her one year old daughter named Amily. She arrived to the U.S. from Peru when she was sixteen years old. She said: “I came here with my father and sister 10 years ago. My mom and brother stayed in my country, but I still go visit sometimes.”

 

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After arriving to NY, Malgai went to North high school in Franklin Square.”I went to high school for two years and it was fun,” she said. “There was so many Spanish students in the school.”

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Becoming a cashier is not the dream job for Malgai. “I studied for two years after high school and became a medical assistant in 2010,” Malgai said. “But I couldn’t find a job because they ask for experience and I don’t have experience.”

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Malgai is contented with this job. It would be wonderful if I could find a job as a medical assistant but “I’m happy now,” Malgai said. “I started with minimum wadges but I got raised, and I get health benefit and the company pay for holidays and vacation.”
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Time goes fast for Malgai when it gets busy. She said: “I like it when it’s busy time goes fast.”
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Malgai is thankful that she gets to work and have family support with raising her daughter.”My sister lives with me and she watches my daughter,” she said.
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“Now, I’m happy with my job.” but in the future Malgai  wants to stop working and wants to enjoy life. She said:”When I get older, maybe after retiring, I would like to go back to my country and enjoy life.”

 

 

 

Photo Series

 

  The Story of Syrian Refugee Crisis

  Photos of Syrians Refugee

Sometimes people don’t have to speak in order to express their feelings and emotions. There comes a time when people want others to just understand their agony and recognize what they are facing and dealing with. Over the past several years, life has been very harsh for Syrian Refugees who had fled from their home country to escape the war. However, the struggle did not just end by leaving the war; it is only a different chapter in their fight for survival.

In this series of photos, one cannot overlook the distress and difficulties Syrians Refugees have been facing; trying to find a safer place to not only live, but survive. These powerful images can only touch and influence others more than any spoken word itself.

For the most part, this sequence shows a variety of changed shots; wide, medium, close medium, depth of filed and angle shots. The variety of the pictures gives a sense which allows a certain number of emotions being unraveled throughout these series of photos. For example, the first picture is a wide photo of a helicopter patrolling over a Syrian child who has just arrived at a beach on the Greek island of Lesbos. It is a great choice to start the sequence with this image because it gives the viewers an actual sense of disturbance that a child in the twenty-first century has to undergo. The last photo was also wide and was in fact another well-thought-of choice that showed a dinghy of Syrian refugees, after it’s motor broke down off the coast of Kos, continues to afloat in the Aegean Sea between Turkey and Greece; thanks to the assistance of a local man.

As one can see, in most (if not all) of the photos in this series; the photos are seizing and revealing the suffering and pain that these Syrian Refugees are enduring whilst fleeing their native country.  For the most part, many of the refugees have survived their journey to new countries. Nevertheless, we can empathize with them and most certainly not overlook their pain.